Is mobile killing the LAN?

I was talking with an industry CEO the other day and he offered an intriguing thought. He said that the LAN is dead — along with its associated routers and hubs and other network hardware — and that mobile has killed it. But the LAN isn’t dead, I resisted, noting that there are LANs within just about every corporate campus in the country.

And yet his argument can’t be dismissed. All of the data and security assumptions that existed when LANs came into being have gone away, courtesy of cloud and mobile. Still, I insisted, that’s an argument for why LANs should be dead, not that they are.

Let’s explore this a bit more. The CEO I was chatting with is Steven Sprague, from a cybersecurity vendor called Rivetz.

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from Computerworld http://www.computerworld.com/article/3218115/mobile-wireless/is-mobile-killing-the-lan.html#tk.rss_all

IDG Contributor Network: Challenges in realizing the promises of the holistic edge

Cloud providers such as Amazon, Google, Facebook and Microsoft are already rolling out distributed cloud infrastructure. Whilst the central cloud is established as an integral part of current and future networks, there are key issues that make the central cloud simply not the solution to several use cases.

  • Latency, also known as the Laws of Physics: The longer the distance is between two communicating entities, the longer the time it takes to move content there. Whilst the delay of reaching out to the cloud today might be tolerable for some applications, it will not be the case for emerging applications that will require nearly instantaneous responses (e.g. in industrial IoT control, robots, machines, autonomous cars, drones, etc.).
  • Data volume: The capacity of communication networks will simply not scale with the insane amount of raw data that is anticipated will need ferrying to and from a remote cloud center.
  • Running costs: The cost of a truly massive computational and storage load in the cloud will simply not be economically sustainable over the longer term.
  • Regulatory: There are and will very likely be new constraints (privacy, security, sovereignty, etc.) which will impose restrictions on what data may or may not be transferred and processed in the cloud.

So it certainly does make sense to distribute the cloud and interconnect this distributed infrastructure together with the central cloud. This process has already begun. One good tangible example is Amazon’s launch of the AWS GreenGrass (AWS for the Edge) product and their declared intentions to use their Whole Foods Stores (in addition to the small matter of selling groceries) as locations for future edge clouds/data centers. In general, cloud providers, perhaps driven by their real estate choices, have a relatively conservative view of the edge, restricting it to a point of presence typically 10 to 50 km from the consumer.

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from Computerworld http://www.computerworld.com/article/3218066/mobile-wireless/challenges-in-realizing-the-promises-of-the-holistic-edge.html#tk.rss_all

Microsoft Germany agrees to stop forcing Windows upgrade downloads

After 18 months of delays, Microsoft has responded to a cease-and-desist complaint filed by Munich’s Baden-Würtenberg consumer rights center (Verbraucherschutz) by vowing to never again forcibly download upgrade files onto customers’ computers, prior to obtaining their consent. Microsoft had lost in Munich courts twice and submitted this stipulation prior to the third, presumably final, round.

According to my own translation of the government’s press release, Microsoft has agreed it will no longer download Windows upgrade files before explicitly receiving permission.

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from Computerworld http://www.computerworld.com/article/3218089/microsoft-windows/microsoft-germany-agrees-to-stop-forcing-windows-upgrade-downloads.html#tk.rss_all

BrandPost: Today’s Enterprise: Mobile, Agile, and In Need of Security

Is the era of the desk job behind us? Unquestionably, if you define a desk job as one that requires you to stay at your desk. IDC predicts that over the next five years, the number of mobile workers in the U.S. will grow from 96.2 million to 105.4 million, making them nearly three-quarters of the entire U.S. workforce.

The growth of the mobile workforce will only continue to accelerate with the ongoing migration to cloud-based applications and services. After all, there’s no reason to tie users to their desks when they can access the tools and data they need to do their jobs from wherever they happen to be. However, as applications and users continue to move outside the physical boundaries of the enterprise, organizations face an urgent challenge: How do they take advantage of greater mobility and the agility it supports without risking the security of sensitive data and business-critical applications?

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from Computerworld http://www.computerworld.com/article/3218624/security/today-s-enterprise-mobile-agile-and-in-need-of-security.html#tk.rss_all

This one’s definitely low-powered

Pilot fish is having a problem with cable-company-provided webmail, and it seems like the logical thing to do is to contact the company through its online chat system.

“I did this while at work so I could multitask on other activities, as I figured this would take a while,” says fish.

“I explained that the email search box doesn’t work very often — I enter a word to search, wait for the drop down list of whether it’s the sender, subject or email text and then wait…and wait…and wait..and nothing happens.”

On the other end of the chat, “Gavin” asks some of the same questions several times, but after five minutes tells fish, “I will go ahead and fix this issue for you.”

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from Computerworld http://www.computerworld.com/article/3218424/it-industry/this-ones-definitely-low-powered.html#tk.rss_all

How to choose the right enterprise mobility management tool

It’s almost redundant to refer to a “mobile workforce,” because so much of the workforce today is using mobile devices in some fashion. Managing this large and expanding environment continues to be a huge challenge for IT, and for a growing number of organizations, enterprise mobility management (EMM) is the solution of choice.

Recent industry research shows the expected growth in demand for EMM products, which typically incorporate mobile device management (MDM), mobile application management (MAM), mobile security and mobile content management. An April 2017 report from The Radicati Group forecasts that worldwide revenues for the EMM market will total $1.8 billion by year-end 2017. This will increase to more than $3.3 billion by year-end 2021, for an average annual growth rate of 18% over the next four years.

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from Computerworld http://www.computerworld.com/article/2486767/mobile-device-management/mobile-device-management-how-to-choose-the-right-enterprise-mobility-management-tool.html#tk.rss_all

How to get Android 8.0 Oreo on your Pixel or Nexus right now

I don’t know if you heard, but that solar eclipse wasn’t the only significant event of the day. Today also marked the official unveiling of Google’s Android 8.0 Oreo release — the software previously known only as “Android O” (oh, yes).

While Google’s own Pixel and Nexus devices are almost always first in line for a fresh Android rollout, this year’s dessert-themed delight isn’t actually quite ready to be served to everyone just yet. Google says it’s in the midst of “carrier testing” with the Pixel, Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P Oreo builds and expects to start sending updates out to those devices soon.

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from Computerworld http://www.computerworld.com/article/3218166/android/android-80-oreo-upgrade.html#tk.rss_all