Apple edges closer to cursory code review for all Mac apps

Apple will soon make a code review mandatory for all applications distributed outside its own Mac App Store by new developers, a first step towards requiring all Mac software to pass similar reviews.

The Cupertino, Calif. company argued that the process, which it calls “notarization,” would build a more secure macOS environment. “We’re working with developers to create a safer Mac user experience through a process where all software, whether distributed on the [Mac] App Store or outside of it, is signed or notarized by Apple,” the company stated in an April 10 message on its developer portal.

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from Computerworld https://www.computerworld.com/article/3391202/apple-edges-closer-to-cursory-code-review-for-all-mac-apps.html#tk.rss_all

Did she at least get to say, ‘I told you so’?

A local beer distributor is notorious for not exactly being a Best Place to Work in IT, so pilot fish is grateful he has never worked there, but he knows quite a few people who have. One of his friends — we’ll call her Betty — is charged with keeping the company’s tablet computers up and running. The actual job she was hired for? Salaried accountant — no overtime pay.

The tablets are used for a variety of mission-critical tasks, like inventory control and planning the daily routes for the delivery trucks. They’re old, and frequently mistreated by the warehouse workers who use them. Hardly a day goes by without at least one coming in for repair. That keeps Betty pretty busy, and she already has a full workload of accounting tasks. 

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from Computerworld https://www.computerworld.com/article/3390723/did-she-at-least-get-to-say-i-told-you-so.html#tk.rss_all

Android versions: A living history from 1.0 to Q

What a long, strange trip it’s been.

From its inaugural release to today, Android has transformed visually, conceptually and functionally — time and time again. Google’s mobile operating system may have started out scrappy, but holy moly, has it ever evolved.

Here’s a fast-paced tour of Android version highlights from the platform’s birth to present.

Android versions 1.0 to 1.1: The early days

Android made its official public debut in 2008 with Android 1.0 — a release so ancient it didn’t even have a cute codename.

Things were pretty basic back then, but the software did include a suite of early Google apps like Gmail, Maps, Calendar, and YouTube, all of which were integrated into the operating system — a stark contrast to the more easily updatable standalone-app model employed today.

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from Computerworld https://www.computerworld.com/article/3235946/android-versions-a-living-history-from-1-0-to-today.html#tk.rss_all

Microsoft lets SMB workers share Office on a single PC with expanded M365 Business rights

Microsoft this week announced it has added shared computer activation (SCA) for Office to the less-expensive Microsoft 365 Business subscription, giving small- and medium-sized businesses a way for multiple employees to run Office’s productivity applications from a single PC.

“((This will help)) in scenarios where multiple users are connecting to the same remote computer at the same time ((or)) where multiple users share the same computer and the users are logging in with their own account,” Ashanka Iddya, a senior product manager, wrote in a Monday post to a company blog.

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from Computerworld https://www.computerworld.com/article/3391056/microsoft-lets-smb-workers-share-office-on-a-single-pc-with-expanded-m365-business-rights.html#tk.rss_all

BrandPost: How Cloud Fax Helps Companies Meet Their Sustainability Goals

These days, everyone wants to save the planet.

Electric cars roam the streets. Solar panels soak up the sun beating down on our rooftops. We all want to do our part, but even throwing away trash in a public place can stop you in your tracks: Do I put this paper cup go in the landfill receptacle or is it recyclable? Can I mix paper, plastic, metal, and glass? Do I put it in the green or blue container?

Meanwhile, sky-high utility rates are forcing us to conserve at home. And some of us are installing smart plugs in our homes to save us from the drain of “vampire power” — things that are “on” even when they’re not.

Businesses are not immune to the challenge. Sustainability is a catchall phrase that applies to more than just the greenest of the socially conscious. It has scooped up the corporate world, too.

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from Computerworld https://www.computerworld.com/article/3390717/how-cloud-fax-helps-companies-meet-their-sustainability-goals.html#tk.rss_all

The curiously missing piece in Google’s Chromebook puzzle

from Computerworld https://www.computerworld.com/article/3390307/google-chromebook-puzzle.html#tk.rss_all

6 best note-taking apps for an Apple iPad

We all need to take notes, and these six note-taking apps all have their own unique advantages, particularly used with Apple Pencil.

The app you’ve got: Apple Notes

Apple’s Notes app works quite well with an Apple Pencil but is quite limited in comparison with the more full-featured choices in this collection. You can use it to keep sketches, notes, drawings, web links and more. I use this app a lot, but I’d really value better export, filing and deep linking options within the app, so I could not only link notes up to one another but also bring them inside third-party project management and shared project folders. It would also be useful if you could sync Notes up elsewhere than iCloud.

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from Computerworld https://www.computerworld.com/article/3390657/6-best-note-taking-apps-for-an-apple-ipad.html#tk.rss_all

Security theater, ’80s style

It’s the late 1980s and pilot fish is working on business application development for an aerospace and defense contractor where physical security is surprisingly lax. There’s a guard on duty at the front desk during business hours, but that’s about the extent of it. That changes with the announcement that all personal gear will be subject to inspection on leaving the building.
Now there are guards 24/7, and everyone leaving the building is politely requested by those guards to open their briefcases and backpacks. The guards then take a look inside before waving the owners through.
Rumor has it that this security push came about because some Apple Mac computers have gone missing. And it continues for about six months, and then suddenly ceases.
What happened? Employees have to rely on rumor again, which holds that the cleaning crew had taken the Macs, which makes sense given that large, wheeled trashcans would make the job easy.
The exit checks never turned up anything, but even law-abiding pilot fish can’t help but notice that it would be pretty easy to cover any contraband in a bag with a few clothes or newspapers and never be discovered, given the cursory nature of the searches.

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from Computerworld https://www.computerworld.com/article/3390542/security-theater-80s-style.html#tk.rss_all

(Insider Story)

from Computerworld https://www.computerworld.com/article/3182846/how-to-fix-six-windows-10-headaches.html#tk.rss_all